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ancientart:

Details from the Egyptian Tomb of Sennedjem in the necropolis of Deir el-Medina. Sennedjem lived in the reigns of Seti I and Ramesses II during the 19th Dynasty.

Photos courtesy of & taken by kairoinfo4u.

Data Deluge: The Thinking Eye - Edward Tufte

A Lecture by Edward Tufte 4th April 2013 Harvard University

scienceisbeauty:

Spinning polyhedrons made with Persistence of Vision Raytracer (POV-Ray). It is relaxing, right?

Via Wikimedia Commons

Richard Serra Unveils Sculpture in Qatar Desert - YouTube

(Source: anuminium)

enochliew:

0513 by Deskriptiv

Done for Wired magazine (UK)

(Source: behance.net)

futurescope:

// Nice Map. Have a look at Germany! Gamma Radiation Sensors all over the place.

prostheticknowledge:

Thingful

An online map that marks and records public Internet-Of-Things projects around the world:

Thingful is a discoverability engine for The Public Internet of Things, providing a geographical index of where things are, who owns them, and how and why they are used.

Today, millions of people and organisations around the world already have and use connected ‘things’, ranging from energy monitors, weather stations and pollution sensors to animal trackers, geiger counters and shipping containers. Many choose to, or would like to, make their data available to third parties – either directly as a public resource or channeled through apps and analytical tools.

Thingful organises ‘things’ around locations and categories and structures ownership around Twitter profiles (which can be either people or organisations), enabling citizens to discuss why and how they are using their devices and data. Because, the ‘who’, ‘why’ and ‘where’ are ultimately far more important in The Public Internet of Things than the ‘what’.

Explicitly built for people, communities, companies and cities that want to make the data from these ‘things’ available and useful to others, Thingful aggregates and indexes public information from some of the major IoT platforms and data infrastructures around the world, providing direct links to datasets and profile pages for the public things that it knows about.

While this is interesting to see the scope of a potential future of internet-controllable objects … you can’t help think that there would be a huge vulnerability and scale of cyber-attacks to home devices that would be unsettling (such as this story where a baby monitor was accessed by a hacker).

You can explore Thingful yourself here

(via humanscalecities)

archatlas:

Ben Sack

navisis:

Desert Breath, 1997

Danae Stratou (D.A.S.T.)

(via navisis)